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National Treasure - Mixed-Up Nail
During the scene when all the characters are in the huge underground cave, and when Ben (Nicholas Cage) is hanging from the broken board, look at the nail. It is circular, and has a shine in the metal. In the time of our founding fathers, the nails were cast square, so it was easier to make. And the metal wasn't shiny, it was dull, because they didn't need to take the time to refine the ore.
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Contributed By:
Munkeymann03 on 12-03-2004
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Comments:
riverdealer@yahoo.com writes:
this is a slipup, with use of CGI effects, the nails could have been modified, or completely covered up (erased), therefore, the fact is it is a slip up
4 of 5 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
Yavanna writes:
This is a slip-up. Courtesy of Antiques Roadshow and the History Detectives, more people are learning about such historical trivia. The nails were only seen in this one shot; the filmmakers wouldn't have had to stretch too far to find two or three antique-style nails for it.
3 of 4 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
Chuck writes:
I agree that it's not a slip-up, but a degree to which they attempted to be authentic to the supposed time period.
2 of 3 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
pjrocker7 writes:
Also how many nails from the 1700's are there?
3 of 5 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
Dan Slep writes:
Hey the 'huge underground cave' has been built, secret to civilisation for years and years. What is there to suggest that they followed the typical building regulations of 1000 years ago?
3 of 5 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
Munkeymann03 writes:
This is a slip up. After more than 250 years, the nails would have rusted, or at least would not be shining new. My dad works in the lumber business, and he is a little bit eccentric about his facts. In the 1700's they used a simple mold to make nails, and they didn't really care about appearance. The nails would come out sloppy and square. They weren't like this in the movie, so it was a slip up. And don't try to use big words to confuse people.
2 of 4 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
kj31 writes:
Unfortunatly for us, the rest of the world does not know to much about the nails of 1700s or about that time. This was not a slip-up, just not devling into the history of nails from that time period. It is really not a big deal.
1 of 8 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes


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