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Midsummer Night's Dream - Who's Scratching?
In Act 4, scene 1 of "A Midsummer night's Dream", Bottom is taking advantage of fairies suddenly waiting on him, and gives orders to 4 fairies. He asks a fairy anmed Peaseblossem to scratch his head, and another fairy named Cobweb to hunt a bee so he can have some honey. He then orders a fairy named Mustardseed to help Cobweb scratch his head, even though Cobweb went off to hunt, and Peaseblossom is scratching his head. You'd think Shakespeare would have seen that...
Special Requirements:
Most any copy of "A Midsummer night's Dream"
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Contributed By:
Notum on 08-03-2001
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Comments:
Clawed writes:
Perhaps this is an actual slip up, but here's what I think. Bottom is very obviously absent minded, and not very bright. Perhaps Shakespeare meant this to be that Bottom has already forgotten which fairy he wanted to do what, or that he cannot tell them apart.
20 of 24 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
tina writes:
Remember that Shakespeare never got the chance to edit his own work when it was published. Everything was secondhand, from the actors. One may have made a mistake and it was published.
7 of 7 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
TheaterGeek writes:
I'm in drama club, and I played Peaseblossom when we did that play a few weeks ago. I thought it was the kid playing Bottom kept messing up, calling me Cobweb, but I guess it was the script.
0 of 0 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
Notum writes:
Possibly, but Bottom only mistook words, never names, except for Hercules. He would mistake "deflowered" for "devoured" or "hear my Thisby's face" instead of "see my Thisby's face", but he never mistook someone's identity.
1 of 5 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes


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