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Jurassic Park - Fake Helecopter
1: In the end , when all of them are leaving the island, you see a shot of them under the helecopter.
2: You can see that the blades of the helecopter are spinning fast enough that they can take off an instant later, yet when all of them were under the helecopter, their hair was sitting flat on their heads, evidence that Spielburg used a bluescreen but for got to use wind effect on the actors. =)
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Avg. Rating:    6.2 of 10 - (88 votes cast)
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Contributed By:
Catbarph on 01-02-2000
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Comments:
garethgazz writes:
When he sees the more talented actors? The actors dont just make stuff up on the set! It is carefully rehearsed and Attenborough is one of the most acclaimed actors in the world.
5 of 7 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
dxdec writes:
lol!, I can imagine them stepping off the choppa and Attenborough looking back and thinking 'Oh, look, those talented actors are ducking, maybe i should duck'. Some people do duck, some dont. People duck in films because they seem to think there is still considerable downforce from the rotors and a risk of somebody getting their head chopped off, which is bulls**t. Also you can get out standing but nearer the edge of the rotors where they dip down slightly human instinct makes yah duck.
3 of 3 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
TK writes:
This happens (ducking when near a helecopter) all the time - in the movies and in real life. I don't understand it because think about it: The blades are around 10 to 12 feet above the ground, how tall are you? I'm just a little over 6'2" so I always stand straight up when walking under the blades. My point is that there is no reason for any of them to duck! TK
3 of 4 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
AJK writes:
Especially Lord Attenborough, who (no offence :) ) is only about 4 feet tall! AJK
2 of 2 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
Tony writes:
More talented than sir Richard Attenbrough. I don't think so. It was more like he was so excited to show off his island, he disregarded the blades.
1 of 1 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
GT-350 guy writes:
I work for Paramount and we rent Green,Blue,Red even Purple screens. It has to do with character and wardrobe settings. Dark clothes. Bright screens. Something hard to understand. I still don't get it, and I set all the equipment up.
1 of 1 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
Narrikk writes:
I don't know... on the subject of the actors ducking, I don't know if that's really a mistake. I mean, even when going under helicoptor blades another five feet above my head (I'm only five foot four), when stepping out of a helicoptor I always duck a little bit. Well, I've only been in a helicoptor once, but I still ducked a bit. Some people do it in other funny situations, too - haven't you ever seen a six foot tall man duck slightly going through a seven foot doorway? People do it occasionally. It's not just crazy/stupid actors.
1 of 1 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
gosuka writes:
I also like the chopper scene when they first arrive. The old man gets out standing quite erect. Then when he turns around and sees the more talented actors ducking down to avoid the blades, he quickly gets his wits back and follows suit.
2 of 4 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
CaptainSolo writes:
The thing about blue-screen is, that actually a lot of colors are used for them. There are several reasons, why blue and green are used in most cases. Blue was used since the early days of visual effects. Most film-types (in those days nothing was done digitally, but the film-strips had three chemical, phosphoric layers, for the basic colors red, green and blue) where known to react best on the color blue, so this color could easily be extracted (in fact it wasn't EASY at all, but a very complex procedure). Because of this, blue was chosen for backgrounds, that had to be replaced. Today, all special effects are composed (or 'assembled') in the computer - digitally. And for a computer it is more easy to identify the color green in the screen, so most of those effects are now done with green-screens. However, the color blue is still used today, due to tradition AND the fact that blue is the color which occurs least in skin-color. But as GT-350 stated right, it is of course always a question of the foreground's color. If you wear harsh blue jeans in front of a blue screen, your legs might disappear in the effect...
3 of 6 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
KenDaLL WoLf writes:
I thought it was a green screen... instead of blue screen. I used to watch Who'd Line Is It Anyway, and that one dude was always in front of a green screen.
2 of 8 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes


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