Movies | TV | Books | Quotes Easter Eggs | Drink Recipes
[Slipups.com Logo] The Slip-Up ArchiveTM
SLIPUPS.COM
Google
Web slipups.com
Home > TV > E - H > Fruit Loops Commercial Bloopers Add a Slip-Up | Help
   
Fruit Loops Commercial - Grammar Mistake
At the end of the commercial, Toucan Sam says, "I hope the next thousand years is as tasty as the last." He should have said "I hope the next thousand years are as tasty as the last." or "I hope the next millenium is as tasty as the last."
Special Requirements:
The commercial for Fruit Loops with Millenium Twos
Avg. Rating:    3.2 of 10 - (171 votes cast)
Your Rating:   
Contributed By:
Buck Bonanza on 12-24-1999
Reviewed By:
Webmaster

Pictures Click on the thumbnails for a full-size image, or send in your own
Be the first to send us your picture of this Slip-Up!
Comments:
wert writes:
I don't think you're supposed to put grammar mistakes on this site. Doesn't it say that in the rules for submitting slip-ups?
22 of 26 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
TheSlipUpMan writes:
He is a bird! What kind of schooling do you think he can get? Give him a break!
13 of 17 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
poop writes:
They don't care about grammar. All they want to do is sell their item.
8 of 10 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
Homer writes:
isn't he, like, a talking BIRD? did that escape you? he's a BIRD. a BIRD! (bird brain)
6 of 8 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
LaurLaur! writes:
Actually it is not a grammar mistake. Most likely the bird was referring to the next thousand years in a singular way. Think about it...it will make sense.
5 of 7 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
DarkBunnyofInle writes:
Unless he was referring to the last thousand years as singular and not each individual year.
3 of 4 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
vonbontee writes:
Tizzinatrix, you're right about everything: mille is indeed 1000, and so 1000 yrs is a millennium. So why, all of a sudden, does 'millimetre' mean not "1000 metres" but "one-1000th of a metre"!? There's no consistency: "millennium" = 1000 years, yet "milligram" = 1/1000th of a gram; "millimetre" = 1/1000 of a metre, but "millipede" = "1000 legs" (They don't really have that many, of course!) Also worth noting: in Great Britain, "billion" means "one million times one million", not 1000 times one million like in North America. The British billion is the North American trillion...
4 of 6 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
DanaMac writes:
This is SO not a grammar mistake! It's confusing, and you probably forgot this from your highschool English classes, but anything dealing with things that are not certain (such as hopes, wishes, and dreams) is a special verb tense called Subjunctive. It's the same reason that you say, "If I were you" instead of "If I was you." Using the subjunctive tense, his quote is exactly correct...look it up!
3 of 4 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
The Tizzinatrix writes:
As a French and linguistics major and a speaker of six languages (English, French, German, Spanish, Italian, and Mandarin Chinese or Hanyu), I can assure you that the reason a millennium is called such is because its Latin root mille means 1000. Another example: 1 millimeter= 1/1000 meters. The word thousand in English is a Germanic word, similar to its equivalent in German: tausand. Million, I conjecture, comes from the fact that the number represents one thousand thousands 1,000,000. In French 1 million is un million, but 1 billion is un milliard. That I haven't quite figured out.
3 of 5 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
Nairb writes:
But the key word is "years," which is plural. Therefore, there is no doubt that it was a grammar mistake.
3 of 6 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
Nairb writes:
He would have had to say "millennium" in order for it to be singlar.
2 of 4 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
moviechic writes:
It wouldn't be correct to say "the next millenium." It is still the second millenium after Jesus' birth. Actually it was about 6 years ago. And it is not a grammar mistake. It is singular in meaning. The key word is "next". So, it would be: "The next is as fun." Get it?
2 of 4 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
DarkBunnyofInle writes:
Yes, years is plural, but in the syntax here it can be singular in meaning, like watching "the news" you don't watch one "new"
2 of 5 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
v!$!t0r writes:
Well, MILLEnnium might not have the same root or whatever as million, because in French, "mille" means thousand, so yeah, there must be a reason it's not a thousinium, but if that's it then why is it a "million"? :)
2 of 5 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
Dave writes:
GOOD EARS! Do they still show that commercial. I will look out for it.
2 of 7 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
WaySarcastic writes:
Random thought: Why do they call it a MILLIneium if it's only a thousand years? Shouldn't it be a thousinium?
1 of 8 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes


Register - My Settings - FAQ - Privacy Policy - About Us - Contact Us