Movies | TV | Books | Quotes Easter Eggs | Drink Recipes
[Slipups.com Logo] The Slip-Up ArchiveTM
SLIPUPS.COM
Google
Web slipups.com
Home > TV > U - Z > X-Files, The Bloopers Add a Slip-Up | Help
   
X-Files, The - Made-Up Burns
In the first season episodes Fallen Angel and Fire, a doctor and Scully (respectively) make references to "5th and 6th degree burns". There's no such thing as a 5th or 6th degree burn. 1st degree burns involve damage only to the epidermis. 2nd degree burns extend through the entire epidermis and part of the dermis. 3rd degree burns damage the entire skin, that is, all of the dermis and epidermis. Any burn that damages below the skin is known as a 4th degree burn. I cracked up the first time I saw this.. and then laughed even harder when the mistake was repeated a couple episodes later! From what I've heard, this may have been repeated yet AGAIN in episodes I haven't seen..
Special Requirements:
episodes Fallen Angel and Fire
Avg. Rating:    4.4 of 10 - (298 votes cast)
Your Rating:   
Contributed By:
Coldfyre on 05-03-2001
Reviewed By:
Webmaster

Pictures Click on the thumbnails for a full-size image, or send in your own
Be the first to send us your picture of this Slip-Up!
Comments:
A Final Wish writes:
(i) First degree burn shows erythema. (ii) Second degree burn is characterized by vesication. (iii) Third degree burn involves destruction of superficial layer of skin. (iv) Fourth degree burn shows total destruction of true layer of skin. (v) Fifth degree burn is characterized by involvement of subcutaneous tissue, deep fascia and muscles. (iv) Sixth degree burn includes destruction of blood vessels, nerves, serous cavities, bones etc.
165 of 174 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
biveg writes:
Fifth and sixth degree burns do exist. The reason most people haven't heard of burns over the third degree is because victims do not survive them (aside from fictional characters in The X-Files, that is.) It's pathology. From answers.com: "Burns that injure the tissues underlying the skin, such as the muscles or bones, are sometimes characterized as 'fourth-degree burns.' (In classical medical literature there were six degrees; with fourth-degree burns the skin is irretrievably lost, in fifth-degree burns the muscle is irretrievably lost, in sixth-degree burns the bone is charred)." So, what was astonishing was that burns which would normally kill a person - burns that completely destroyed the muscle and bone - were being survived by Cecil L'ively; even being healed. Normally these terms would only be used regarding a corpse, during autopsy. So, not a slip-up, just really good research.
56 of 59 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
Innomen writes:
http://www.boston.com/news/globe/living/articles/2004/02/19/id_never_heard_of_fifth_degree_burns/ This guy had 5th and lived.
23 of 25 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
Burn Nurse writes:
I was a RN burn nurse at a city hospital years ago and we admitted a patient with 6th degree burns. Her burns were caused when she fell asleep while drinking and smoking in bed. The plastic lined mattress caught fire and engulfed her left arm and chest burning away her radius, 3 fingers... I won't go into the extensive other burn details but she only lived a few hours. Usually only pathologists use the terms 4th, 5th and 6th degree burns. They are rarely used when describing wounds of living patients.
15 of 15 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
Katerina writes:
First Degree Burns First degree burns usually result in redness to the top layers of the skin. The skin may feel warm and painful to the touch. There are many causes of first degree burns including hot water from the sink and sunburn. Most first degree burns can be treated at home. First, run the burned area under cold water. Then apply a soothing cream, such as aloe, to the burn and cover with a loose gauze bandage. Over the counter pain killers might be useful to ease discomfort. Second Degree Burns A burn that results in red, blistering skin is a second degree burn. The deeper layers of the skin are affected with this degree of injury and the victim is usually in significant pain. Second degree burns can be caused by flames, chemicals, hot liquids and other catalysts. While some second degree burns can be treated at home, the pain is usually significant enough to warrant a trip to the doctor or hospital. Also, victims of second degree burns might be at risk of shock so they need to be closely monitored. The burn should be treated similarly to a first degree burn, however it is important to prevent infection in the blisters and therefore an antiseptic ointment is often advised. Third Degree Burns Third degree burns go all the way through the skin. The most common causes of this severe injury are electricity, chemicals and fire. Skin that has been damaged by a third degree burn may appear black or white. The nerve endings have been destroyed so the affected area might not hurt but the area adjacent to it will likely hurt. A burn of this severity may cause the victim to go into shock. Third degree burns require medical treatment as quickly as possible and usually require hospitalization. The patient will need IV fluids, antibiotics and likely prescription pain medication. The patient also may need help breathing. The burns will be cleaned and antiseptic ointment will be applied and covered with loose bandages. The bandages should be changed regularly. Some patients are put into high oxygen rooms called hyperbaric chambers. The dead tissue in the burned area is removed surgically. Skin grafts may also be used to replace the burned skin with healthy skin. Third degree burns often result in scarring. Fourth Degree Burns Fourth degree burns damage not only all of the skin in the burned area but also the underlying muscle, tendon and ligament. Very often fourth degree burns are fatal. If a patient survives a fourth degree burn then skin grafting is essential. Fifth and Sixth Degree Burns Fifth and sixth degree burns are most often diagnosed during an autopsy. The damage goes all the way to the bone and everything between the skin and the bone is destroyed. It is unlikely that a person would survive this type of injury but if a miracle occurred then amputation of the affected area would be necessary. Got the info from : http://www.anapolschwartz.com/practices/burn-injury/burn-degrees.asp#Burn Injuries Form
5 of 6 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
Captain Snake writes:
How can you be so sure you can't get 5th and 6th degree burns?
7 of 37 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
xvenus writes:
Considering it is the X-Files with weird ideas about aliens and junk... they can have what ever 'burns' they want, and anything else for that matter.
7 of 42 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
purpleshoes writes:
Yeah, I noticed that too. I was kinda thinkin the same thing. What the heck are 5 and 6 degree burns. Though I didn't see any other episode where they do that. but they could have.
1 of 36 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes


Register - My Settings - FAQ - Privacy Policy - About Us - Contact Us