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Starship Troopers - Gravity and Fire in Space
-Well when the ships are getting blown up, how would the fire "breath" in space.
-And why would they start to float down? There is no gravity in space!
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Contributed By:
Scott on 03-08-2001
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Comments:
donajos3 writes:
You wouldn't need liquid oxygen to make a fire is space. All you need is the normal atmosphere of the ship. People can't breath liquid oxygen anyway, it is too pure and pure oxygen is poisonous to humans and it is also too cold. There is more then enough atmosphere on a ship like the Roger Young to create a fire. Second the gravity-well of Planet P is what pulls the ship down. Gravity-wells are what allow the Space Shuttles and satellites to orbit and not fly off into space; and what pulls particles such as light and other objects into black holes. Earths gravity-well is pulling at 16 meters per second per second and which holds us to the ground.
14 of 19 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
Scolman writes:
-Well when the ships are getting blown up, how would the fire "breath" in space. It could if the ships where expelling liquid oxygen, which is used to let the crew breath. -And why would they start to float down? There is no gravity in space! Course there's no gravity in space. There is however, gravity bring "emitted" from the planet. So that's what would have been pulling them. Also, the explosions on board would have pushed the ship in the wrong direction. Unlike like the thrusters on the Shuttle, these explosions aren't controlled. So the ship would be pushed every which way.
7 of 10 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
MillaMirri writes:
Sure there is gravity in space, it's the balance between gravity and speed that keeps satellites (like federal fleet ships) in orbit. There's no need for the wrecks to float down, they would just keep circling. Atmospheric friction might bring them down eventually, it does with earth satellites but as far i know that's only effective up to a few hundreds of kilometers. Seeing as how the planets appear as discrete discs instead of a wall spanning half the sky as they would from say 200 km, the ships must be in much higher orbits, which brings up the question of how the transports and bug plasma bolts travel so fast between fleet and planet surface, but this is about enough nit-picking for now i think ;)
4 of 4 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
Matt writes:
Actually, Earth's gravity pulls at 32 feet per second square (per second per second) or 9.8 metres per second square... And YES there is gravity in space. Every object pulls on every other object with a force that we call gravity. That force exists everywhere, including space. Also, liquid oxygen is not used for breathing, 'tis used as rocket fuel along with liquid hydrogen.
5 of 7 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
red_wolf_chris writes:
They would be floating "down" in space because of the gravity well from Planet P, also as it is easy to move things in space; the explosions comming from the ship would be more then enough to make this ship go up, down, left, right or any other direction. As for the fires in space, the atmsphere from the ships would be enough to feed the fire
2 of 2 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
krismcewan writes:
Can I just say that all this observation is very well, but until a point when we can actually repel gravity on this planet, even Filming science fiction has its limits to the laws of Physics. And before anyone says anything, I know these things can be done digitally, but let's face it at upwards of $60,000 a second of digital footage, it's cheaper to blow up a model with all its flaws of Earth bound Gravity in tact.
3 of 5 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
JEDIKNIGHT32 writes:
The ships were pretty low in the Atmosphere so if I'm right the Atmoshpere generorating from the Roger Young should have been enough to sustain a five in space. Also, even in space there is a tiny bit of gravity. Just not enough to keep you rooted to one spot. You could easily push some one and they would go flying like a bullet. That's why the Roger Young started heading towards the ground. Besides it's mass was too grate. Still that's my two cents. As for where the ships landed, I have no idea. They could have landed anywhere on Planet P. That's the truth of the matter. I'm only Thirteen so if you want you can ignore me.
0 of 1 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
Joe Shmoe writes:
actually, you can create a zero gravity effect on earth. Its called the Vomit Comet, NASA uses it to train astronauts. The plane flies miles and miles up, then dives down and the same rate as something would normally fall, so anything inside of the plane is effectively zero gravity. the only problem with this solution is the scale that you would have to have it done on for this movie. Just my two cents BerrYfizzII
0 of 2 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
Bobby writes:
I think the ships were in the very upper reaches for the atmosphere. So there would be enough oxygen and gravity to putt the ships down. What I don't get is where did the ships come down? After all they were pulled down.
1 of 5 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes


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